Dr. Roselyn Hsueh, Ph.D.

Teaching

Teaching and Mentoring: Teaching and Research Team

My teaching and mentoring, and advising are represented by the classes I teach and my research team of graduate and undergraduates.

Political Economy of Identity in the Global Era: Concepts and Debates on Contexts, Causes, and Effects (Ph.D. seminar)

This graduate course explores the conceptual and theoretical tools that have been brought to bear to investigate the role of identity and relationship between economics and identity in the context of globalization, particularly post-cold war developments. It exposes students to some of the major debates on conceptualizing and operationalizing the multidimensionality of identity; the context-specific issues that make identity an important factor to explore as both a cause and an effect in a globalizing economy; and existing research on what shapes identity and the impact of identity. We ask the following questions: Why study identity? How to study identity? What causes identity? How does identity matter? We encounter these questions via existing literature across subfields of political science, sociology, and history; different methodological lens; and substantive knowledge of empirical reality.

China: State and Society (Undergraduate seminar)

This course surveys contemporary Chinese politics and political economy, recognizing the roots in China’s history (from the fall of the Qing Dynasty to the May Fourth Movement to the Anti-Japanese War to the Rise of Mao and Post-Mao Reforms). Course readings, lectures, and discussions emphasize the process of converting the Maoist socialist system into a market one integrated into the global economy, and the political implications of this transformation of state-society relations overtime. Course requirements include class participation, midterm, final, and two short papers.

Political Economy of Development (Ph.D. seminar)

This graduate course exposes students to some of the major debates in the international and comparative political economy on the origins and transformations of three key institutional fields: the state, market institutions, and the international economy. We read classic works in political economy on the philosophical underpinnings of the role of the state in the economy; and more recent works on the relationship between the state and market creation, evolution, and reform in the context of global integration. We also survey selected works on the political economy of the newly industrializing economies of Asia and Latin America, developing countries in South Asia and Africa, and the post-Communist economies of China and Russia.

Evidence and Knowledge (Political Science major requirement)

This course introduces undergraduates to the methods political scientists use to answer questions about politics and political phenomena. After learning about the different types of political research, we will focus on theory-oriented empirical research (which differentiates political scientists from political journalists and “talking heads”). In doing so, we will learn about concept formation and measurements, hypotheses and theory-building, and the various research methods, which allow political scientists to test theoretical claims in the social world. We will learn about the basic difficulties involved in making descriptive and causal inferences about politics and examine four basic research strategies: experimentation, large N or quantitative studies, small N or qualitative studies, and formal modeling.

The goals of the course are to 1) provide students with the analytic tools to critically evaluate social science research and causal arguments found in everyday life; and 2) improve students’ ability to pose and answer research questions on their own. Course requirements will include attendance and participation (including in-class assignments), one midterm, a final exam, and three homework projects. Regular attendance is critical for success in this class: students will be randomly called upon to participate; and in-class assignments, which offer the opportunity to practice content introduced in lecture, will count toward the final grade.

The State and Market: China in a Globalized World (Ph.D. seminar)

This graduate course examines the relationship between the state and the market in the context of internationalization, using contemporary China as a major case study. In the first part of the semester, students will be introduced to the theoretical and policy debates within the international and comparative political economy literature that arose out of the state and market building experiences of early (France, Germany, Russia, and England) and late developers (including the newly industrialized countries of East Asia and Latin America, post-Communist transitioning Countries, and developing countries). Students will draw lessons from these countries’ development trajectories to understand the role of the state in confronting global market forces. Later in the course, using theoretical debates and history as guide, students will analytically examine the role of the Chinese state in confronting the challenges of globalization since China’s Open Door Policy in 1978. Course requirements include class participation, online memos, a theoretical review essay, and a short research paper.

Globalization and the State (Undergraduate seminar)

This course examines the relationship between the governments, society, and the multi-faceted phenomenon of globalization. We will characterize globalization’s cultural, economic, political, and social manifestations and attempt to understand their impacts. In doing so, students will be introduced to the theoretical and policy debates within the international and comparative political economy literature in Political Science that arose out of the state and market building experiences of early (France, Germany, Russia and England) and late developers (including the newly industrialized countries of East Asia and Latin America, post-Communist transitioning Countries and developing countries in Africa). Students will draw lessons from these countries’ development trajectories to understand the role of the state and societal actors in confronting globalization. Course requirements include class participation (attendance, quizzes, and periodic homework assignments), two midterms, and a final.

Comparative Politics of Developing Countries (Advanced undergraduate seminar)

This undergraduate course exposes students to some of the major debates in the study of the politics of developing countries. We study the origins and transformations of three key institutional fields in these countries’ economic and political development: the state, political and economic institutions, and the international economy. We read classic works in Comparative Politics and International Relations on the philosophical underpinnings of the role of the state; and more recent works on the relationship between the state and market creation, evolution, and reform in the context of global integration. We also take a trip around the world and across time to examine the political and economic development of the newly industrializing countries of Asia and Latin America, developing countries in South Asia and Africa, and the post-Communist transitioning countries of China and Russia.

The State and Globalization Reexamined: China, Global Power or Political Decay (Senior writing-intensive capstone)

The rise of China in the age of globalization has grabbed media headlines in recent years. Popular commentary describes China’s incredible economic growth and the political economic system that has sustained such growth as “socialism with Chinese characteristics.” Notwithstanding, pundits and scholars alike predict drastically different futures for China. While acknowledging the skyscrapers and industrial parks of Shanghai and Beijing, some scholars argue that the increasing social economic divide cross regionally and between social classes in China, a consequence of rapid economic growth, will lead to the disintegration of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Others paint a more sanguine picture for the future of the Chinese state: the internal consolidation of political power by the CCP, which has created an economic miracle within the span of less than thirty years, combined with the state’s foreign diplomatic strides, will propel China into a global power. Moreover, among those who predict an integrated China, whether China will be a democracy or remain authoritarian remains in debate. Using the international and comparative political economy literatures as guide, this course examines the theoretical debates and ideological commitments implicit in these opposing analyses about the role of the Chinese state in confronting the forces of globalization since China’s Open Door Policy in 1979. Course requirements include class participation, midterm, final, and two papers.

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